What is a Chapter 12 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 12 Bankruptcy

If you are a Kentucky farmer or fisherman you may be wondering…’what is a chapter 12?”

Chapter 12 bankruptcy is a reorganization bankruptcy intended for family farmers and family fishermen. This chapter is designed specifically for small to medium-sized family operations as there are debt limits for family farmers ($4,031,575.00) and family fishermen ($1,868,200.00) (debt limits are adjusted annually).  This chapter is designed to provide relief for both individuals and corporations subject to certain eligibility criteria. Typically, a Chapter 12 bankruptcy allows a family farmer or family fishermen to restructure debts over a 3-5 year period.  Chapter 12 has many benefits including the ability to cramdown debt to the value of the collateral and settling unsecured debt at a reduced percentage.

In tailoring bankruptcy law to meet the economic realities of family farming and the family fisherman, chapter 12 eliminates many of the barriers such debtors would face if seeking to reorganize under either chapter 11 or 13 of the Bankruptcy Code. For example, chapter 12 is more streamlined, less complicated, and less expensive than chapter 11, which is better suited to large corporate reorganizations. In addition, few family farmers or fishermen find chapter 13 to be advantageous because it is designed for wage earners who have smaller debts than those facing family farmers. In chapter 12, Congress sought to combine the features of the Bankruptcy Code which can provide a framework for successful family farmer and fisherman reorganizations.

The Bankruptcy Code provides that only a family farmer or family fisherman with “regular annual income” may file a petition for relief under chapter 12. 11 U.S.C. §§ 101(18), 101(19A), 109(f). The purpose of this requirement is to ensure that the debtor’s annual income is sufficiently stable and regular to permit the debtor to make payments under a chapter 12 plan. But chapter 12 makes allowance for situations in which family farmers or fishermen have income that is seasonal in nature. Relief under chapter 12 is voluntary, and only the debtor may file a petition under the chapter.

Under the Bankruptcy Code, “family farmers” and “family fishermen” fall into two categories: (1) an individual or individual and spouse and (2) a corporation or partnership. Farmers or fishermen falling into the first category must meet each of the following four criteria as of the date the petition is filed in order to qualify for relief under chapter 12:

  1. The individual or husband and wife must be engaged in a farming operation or a commercial fishing operation.
  2. The total debts (secured and unsecured) of the operation must not exceed $4,031,575 (if a farming operation) or $1,868,200 (if a commercial fishing operation).
  3. If a family farmer, at least 50%, and if family fisherman at least 80%, of the total debts that are fixed in amount (exclusive of debt for the debtor’s home) must be related to the farming or commercial fishing operation.
  4. More than 50% of the gross income of the individual or the husband and wife for the preceding tax year (or, for family farmers only, for each of the 2nd and 3rd prior tax years) must have come from the farming or commercial fishing operation.

In order for a corporation or partnership to fall within the second category of debtors eligible to file as family farmers or family fishermen, the corporation or partnership must meet each of the following criteria as of the date of the filing of the petition:

  1. More than one-half the outstanding stock or equity in the corporation or partnership must be owned by one family or by one family and its relatives.
  2. The family or the family and its relatives must conduct the farming or commercial fishing operation.
  3. More than 80% of the value of the corporate or partnership assets must be related to the farming or fishing operation.
  4. The total indebtedness of the corporation or partnership must not exceed $4,031,575 (if a farming operation) or $1,868,200 (if a commercial fishing operation).
  5. At least 50% for a farming operation or 80% for a fishing operation of the corporation’s or partnership’s total debts which are fixed in amount (exclusive of debt for one home occupied by a shareholder) must be related to the farming or fishing operation.
  6. If the corporation issues stock, the stock cannot be publicly traded.

Information originally published at uscourts.gov.


By: Jamie L. Harris, Esq.

Lexington-Bankruptcy-Attorney_-Jamie-Harris5590

 Jamie Harris is an associate attorney with DelCotto Law Group PLLC. Her practice of law focuses on helping business owners hurdle financial obstacles. Jamie is best known for her experience in filing Chapter 7, 11, 12, and 13 bankruptcies. In her Chapter 11 cases, Jamie has represented companies from many different industries including healthcare, nonprofit, trucking, construction, commercial real estate and telecommunications.

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